Dublin

Dublin  is the capital and largest city of Ireland.Dublin is in the province of Leinster on Ireland’s east coast, at the mouth of the River Liffey.

dublin

Founded as a Viking settlement, the Kingdom of Dublin became Ireland’s principal city following the Norman invasion. The city expanded rapidly from the 17th century and was briefly the second largest city in the British Empire before the Act of Union in 1800. Following the partition of Ireland in 1922, Dublin became the capital of the Irish Free State, later renamed Ireland.

Dublin is administered by a City Council. The city is listed by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network (GaWC) as a global city, with a ranking of “Alpha-“, placing it among the top thirty cities in the world. It is a historical and contemporary centre for education, the arts, administration, economy and industry.

Entertainment Scope in Dublin

Dublin has a vibrant nightlife and is reputedly one of Europe’s most youthful cities, with an estimate of 50% of citizens being younger than 25. There are many pubs across the city centre, with the area around St. Stephen’s Green and Grafton Street, especially Harcourt Street, Camden Street, Wexford Street and Leeson Street, having the most popular nightclubs and pubs.

The best known area for nightlife is Temple Bar, south of the River Liffey. The area has become popular among tourists, including stag and hen parties from Britain. It was developed as Dublin’s cultural quarter and does retain this spirit as a centre for small arts productions, photographic and artists’ studios, and in the form of street performers and small music venues. However, it has been criticised as overpriced, false and dirty by Lonely Planet. In 2014, Temple Bar was listed by the Huffington Post as one of the ten most disappointing destinations in the world. The areas around Leeson Street, Harcourt Street, South William Street and Camden/George’s Street are popular nightlife spots for locals.

Live music is popularly played on streets and at venues throughout Dublin in general, and the city has produced several musicians and groups of international success, including U2, Westlife, Brian McFadden, the Dubliners, the Thrills, Horslips, Jedward, the Boomtown Rats,Boyzone, Ronan Keating, Thin Lizzy, Paddy Casey, Sinéad O’Connor, the Script and My Bloody Valentine. The two best known cinemas in the city centre are the Savoy Cinema and the Cineworld Cinema, both north of the Liffey. Alternative and special-interest cinema can be found in the Irish Film Institute in Temple Bar, in the Screen Cinema on d’Olier Street and in the Lighthouse Cinema in Smithfield. Large modern multiscreen cinemas are located across suburban Dublin. The 3 Arena venue in the Dublin Docklands has played host to many world renowned performers.

 Education

Dublin is the primary centre of education in Ireland, it is home to three universities, Dublin Institute of Technology and many other higher education institutions. There are 20 third-level institutes in the city and in surrounding towns and suburbs. Dublin was European Capital of Science in 2012. The University of Dublin is the oldest university in Ireland dating from the 16th century, and is located in the city centre. Its sole constituent college, Trinity College, was established by Royal Charter in 1592 under Elizabeth I and was closed to Roman Catholics until Catholic Emancipation. The Catholic hierarchy then banned Roman Catholics from attending it until 1970. It is situated in the city centre, on College Green, and has 15,000 students.

Research administration building, Belfield campus, University College Dublin.

The National University of Ireland (NUI) has its seat in Dublin, which is also the location of the associated constituent university of University College Dublin (UCD), has over 22,000 students. UCD’s main campus is at Belfield, about 5 km (3 mi) from the city centre in the southeastern suburbs..

With a continuous history dating back to 1887, Dublin’s principal institution for technological education and research Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT) is Ireland’s largest higher education institution with over 23,000 students. Dublin Institute of Technology specialises in engineering, architecture, sciences, health, digital media, hospitality and business but also offers many art, design, music and humanities programmes. DIT currently has campuses, buildings and research facilities at multiple locations in central Dublin, it has commenced consolidation to a new city-centre campus in Grangegorman.

Dublin Institute of Technology at Kevin St Dublin City University (DCU), formerly known as the National Institute for Higher Education (NIHE), specialises in business, engineering, science, and communication courses. It has around 10,000 students, and is located about 7 km (4 mi) from the city centre in the northern suburbs.

The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) is a medical school which is a recognised college of the NUI, it is situated at St. Stephen’s Green in the city centre. The National University of Ireland, Maynooth, another constituent of the NUI, is in neighbouring Co. Kildare, about 25 km (16 mi) from the city centre. The Institute of European Affairs is also in Dublin. Portobello College has its degrees conferred through the University of Wales.[62] Dublin Business School (DBS) is Ireland’s largest private third level institution with over 9,000 students located on Aungier Street. The National College of Art and Design (NCAD) supports training and research in art, design and media. The National College of Ireland (NCI) is also based in Dublin. The Economic and Social Research Institute, a social science research institute, is based on Sir John Rogerson’s Quay, Dublin 2.

 Dublin Institute of Technology atCathal Brugha St. The Irish public administration and management training centre has its base in Dublin, the Institute of Public Administration provides a range of undergraduate and post graduate awards via the National University of Ireland and in some instances, Queen’s University Belfast. There are also smaller specialised colleges, including Griffith College Dublin, The Gaiety School of Acting and the New Media Technology College.

Outside of the city, the towns of Tallaght in South Dublin and Dún Laoghaire in Dún Laoghaire–Rathdown have regional colleges: The Institute of Technology, Tallaght has full and part-time courses in a wide range of technical subjects and the Dún Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology (IADT) supports training and research in art, design, business, psychology and media technology. The western suburb of Blanchardstown offers childcare and sports management courses along with languages and technical subjects at the Institute of Technology, Blanchardstown.

Here are ten trivia facts about Dublin’s fair city:

1.The name for Dublin in the Irish language is both Dubh Linn and Baile Átha Cliath. While walking around Dublin you’re more likely to see the latter on road signs. The literal meaning of Átha Cliath is “Ford of the Reed Hurdles.”

Dublin or Dubh Linn is derived from the Old Irish Gaelic, which has its literal meaning “Black Pool”. The Dubh Linn was a lake used by the Vikings to moor their trade ships and was connected to the Liffey by the River Poddle.

2. The city of Dublin covers a land area of 44.5 square miles. The average temperature in January is 41°F and the July Average is 63°F. It is estimated that 50% of the city’s residents are under-25 years of age. My advice dress warmly and party hard.

3. Dublin is twinned to cities Barcelona in Catalonia, Spain, Liverpool in the United Kingdom and San Jose, in California.

4. Dublin’s O’Connell Bridge that covers the famed River Liffey is reckoned to be the only bridge in the European continent that has the same width as its length.

This present concrete structure was built in 1863, replacing a wooden bridge built in 1801. Amazingly, prior to that time, O’Connell Bridge was a rope structure that could only carry one person and a donkey at a time.

5. Dublin has a renowned history in the Literary and Movie World with celebrated native names such George Bernard Shaw (dramatist, critic & Nobel Prize winner), James Joyce (writer and poet and writer of Ulysses), Oscar Wilde (playwright, poet, essayist & novelist) and Dracula creator Bram Stoker to name but a few. Prominent Hollywood Actors hailing from the city include Maureen O’Hara, Brendan Gleeson, Gabriel Byrne and Colin Farrell.

 6. The “Oldest Pub in Ireland” is reputed to be located in Dublin. The pub is called the Brazen Head. There has been a pub on this site since 1198.

7. Handel’s classic “Messiah” was premiered for the first time in 1742 in Dublin at the New Music Hall in Fishamble Street, with 26 boys and five men from the St Patrick’s and Christchurch choir cathedrals taking part.

8. Dublin is home to many of Ireland’s most famous musicians, from the Dubliners and Thin Lizzy to Sinead O’Connor and U2.

Many of U2’s back catalogue of albums were recorded in their home city. Windmill Lane Studios was the place where U2 recorded their early work and first three albums. The site at Windmill Lane Studios is covered in graffiti from fans that have paid pilgrimage from all over the world and is known as the “U2 Wall.”

9. Trinity College, the ancient Dublin university set up at the request of Queen Elizabeth I, has had some memorable graduates including Oscar Wilde, Jonathan Swift and, surprisingly, Bram Stoker, creator of Dracula.

10. None of the so-called Dublin Mountains is high enough to meet the criteria required to claim mountain status. The Sugarloaf is the tallest ‘Dublin Mountain’ yet measures a mere 423.3 meters above sea level.

[su_highlight]Credits: Wikipedia and IrishCentral.com[/su_highlight]

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